What To Do On A First Meeting With The Customer?

Each presentation is a decisive occasion for business, and that is why it is essential to know how to present your company with aplomb and intelligence.

  1. Pay Attention To Your Appearance. Less Is More

According to a University of California study, 4 minutes is the time it takes for one person to form first impressions of another — 55% of good or bad concept is based on body language, 38% depends on the tone of voice, and only 7% relate to what was said.

This shows how vital appearance is at a business meeting. Smiling when introducing yourself, greeting firmly, and maintaining a posture capable of transmitting tranquility and security are also attitudes that score points.

Therefore, anything that makes the appearance sloppy or extravagant should be avoided. Women should be careful not to present themselves to customers with chipped nail polish, heavy makeup, miniskirt, and exaggerated cleavage, for example.

It would help if you also were careful with accessories such as huge earrings, pendants, and eyeglasses frames that are too flashy.

In the case of men, it is not recommended to appear in suits that are too loose or too short and short-sleeved shirts. It’s good not to overdo the perfume too; after all, if the customer is allergic, the meeting can end much earlier than expected.

  1. Do Your Homework. Search Your Customer

Researching as much information in advance about the customer you want to win helps make the first date more productive. Or, at the very least, you avoid wasting precious time asking questions that could easily be found in a quick Google search.

But just as you shouldn’t waste time asking about subjects that can be previously researched, it’s no use arriving at the meeting with a heap of paper to try to impress those present and end up getting lost in so much information.

  1. Don’t Pretend You Care About Your Customer. Be Interested

Many entrepreneurs still believe that a good salesperson is a cute and full of gibberish type. Nothing more old-fashioned. This is a thing of the past, from a time when more consumers wanted to buy than companies trying to sell.

With fierce competition, customers have more options and buy from those who demonstrate a better understanding of their needs. Many entrepreneurs fail to show interest in consumer issues.

When introducing yourself to a client, you should not talk too much and monopolize the conversation. Nor is it productive to go around dictating to a potential customer what they should do before they even hear from you. Barring a critical case—like an emergency—it’s also awful to interrupt the conversation to answer your cell phone or check emails during a business meeting. This type of behavior is a typical demonstration of a lack of respect for those in the meeting and should be avoided as much as possible. Visit website for help

Issac Gloria